J.D. Ellis
Vice Presidential Nominee,  America's Party

What Thomas Paine said of those who favored reconciliation with England in 1776, is now true of those who espouse loyalty to a Republican Party that gives us the most successful liberal governor in our nation's history as a presidential nominee:

"Though I would carefully avoid giving unnecessary offence, yet I am inclined to believe, that all those who espouse the doctrine of reconciliation, may be included within the following descriptions. Interested men, who are not to be trusted, weak men who CANNOT see, prejudiced men who will not see, and a certain set of moderate men who think better of the European world than it deserves; and this last class, by an ill-judged deliberation, will be the cause of more calamities to this Continent than all the other three."

--Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

Though I would carefully avoid giving unnecessary offense, yet I am inclined to believe, that all those who say we must support Mitt Romney, as the Republican nominee for president, may be included within the following descriptions. Establishment Republican hacks, who are not to be trusted, weak men who CANNOT see for themselves but blindly follow the urging of the former, prejudiced men who will not see beyond the Republican Party label, and a certain set of quasi-principled but misinformed men who think better of the Republican Party than it deserves; and this last class, by an ill-judged deliberation, will be the cause of more calamities to this Nation than all the other three.

 
 
"Every word employed in the Constitution is to be expounded in its plain, obvious, and common sense, unless the context furnishes some ground to control, qualify, or enlarge it. Constitutions are not designed for metaphysical or logical subtleties, for niceties of expression, for critical propriety, for elaborate shades of meaning, or for the exercise of philosophical acuteness or judicial research. They are instruments of a practical nature, rounded on the common business of human life, adapted to common wants, designed for common use, and fitted for common understandings. The people make them, the people adopt them, the people must be supposed to read them, with the help of common-sense, and cannot be presumed to admit in them any recondite meaning or any extraordinary gloss."  

-- Joseph Story, Constitution (5th ed.) 345, SS 451.