Patriot Post

"Sometimes it is said that man cannot be trusted with the government of himself. Can he, then, be trusted with the government of others?"

-- Thomas Jefferson, First Inaugural Address, 1801
 
 
"The judiciary of the United States is the subtle corps of sappers and miners constantly working under ground to undermine the foundations of our confederated fabric. They are construing our constitution from a co-ordination of a general and special government to a general and supreme one alone."

--Thomas Jefferson, letter to Thomas Ritchie, 1820


 
 
"If we move in mass, be it ever so circuitously, we shall attain our object; but if we break into squads, everyone pursuing the path he thinks most direct, we become an easy conquest to those who can now barely hold us in check."

-- Thomas Jefferson, letter to William Duane, 1811
 
 
"Love your neighbor as yourself and your country more than yourself."

-- Thomas Jefferson, letter to Thomas Jefferson Smith, 1825
 
 
"All, too, will bear in mind this sacred principle, that though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will to be rightful must be reasonable; that the minority possess their equal rights, which equal law must protect, and to violate would be oppression."

-- Thomas Jefferson, First Inaugural Address, 1801

 
 
"And this is the tendency of all human governments. A departure from principle in one instance becomes a precedent for the second; that second for a third; and so on, till the bulk of society is reduced to be mere automatons of misery, to have no sensibilities left but for sinning and suffering."

-- Thomas Jefferson, Letter to Samuel Kercheval, Monticello, July 12, 1816

 
 
"If, then, the control of the people over the organs of their government be the measure of its republicanism, and I confess I know no other measure, it must be agreed that our governments have much less of republicanism than ought to have been expected; in other words, that the people have less regular control over their agents, than their rights and their interests require."

-- Thomas Jefferson, letter to John Taylor, 1816

 
 
"Man, once surrendering his reason, has no remaining guard against absurdities the most monstrous, and like a ship without rudder, is the sport of every wind. With such persons, gullibility, which they call faith, takes the helm from the hand of reason and the mind becomes a wreck."

--Thomas Jefferson, letter to James Smith, 1822

 
 
"The God who gave us life gave us liberty at the same time; the hand of force may destroy, but cannot disjoin them."

-- Thomas Jefferson, Rights of British America, 1774

 
 
"We are firmly convinced, and we act on that conviction, that with nations as with individuals our interests soundly calculated will ever be found inseparable from our moral duties, and history bears witness to the fact that a just nation is trusted on its word when recourse is had to armaments and wars to bridle others."

-- Thomas Jefferson, Second Inaugural Address, 1805